Several Sessions To Send

In hard bouldering, you don’t measure success by ascents. Well, you do and you don’t. Obviously you’re never gonna think someone is a really good climber because they’ve done a load of individual moves in the middle of various climbs. Nevertheless, when you look a little closer at individual sessions, if you measured a their success by whether you climbed something or not, you’d rarely be happy!

Get in deep enough and a good session can even be managing to hold the holds or to almost do one of the hard moves. That’s exactly how it went for me on Monday in Maes Newyddion. The plan was to head over with the family and have a play on Roof of a Baby Buddha 7c+ to see how poorly i would do. Meanwhile, before we left i’d been scrolling through instagram and found a video of the line to the left, Grey House 8a that looked interesting so i thought i’d check that out too.

Grey House. Borderline but most beasties seem to give it 8a. Pocket drag is 👌

A post shared by Chris Doyle (@doylo99) on

Success on this was set on being able to simply do all the individual moves on Buddha Roof, but if i were only able to hang each position, that would suffice as average. Any less than that and i’d be heading home with my head held low.

As we arrived, it turned out we weren’t alone and that old friends Tim Peck and Will Oates were already there, playing on not only Buddha Roof but also Grey House while their companion, who i had not met before named Tom, was in the middle of working on a line i didn’t know about, Teenage Buddha 7a+.

The stand start almost fell on the first effort, as a bit of a warm up around the 6c mark before taking a further three attempts to finish off. It was repeated a few times before i joined Tom on Teenage Buddha. It relinquished quite quickly, if i’m honest, and in much the same as my recent Parisella’s Cave session, i was astounded to be leaving with a new tick!

With the exit moves of Buddha Roof now completed, i tried the starting moves and found that they were equally straightforward, with only the crux moves in the middle left to finish off. Plus the link up, of course.

But i moved left to join Tim on Grey House instead. He was trying the tricksome second move – a dyno from a mediocre left drag crimp and a right pocket to the slopey top – and couldn’t quite get it dialled in every time, for reasons even he didn’t really comprehend. Intrigued, i joined him and to my astonishment, found it going pretty well! After a couple of tries, i was moving in the right direction and after watching the aforementioned video and getting extra beta, i was slapping the top hold!

Eventually, everyone departed the crag and left me alone with Tess to continue jumping into the air. Periodically, i’d jump off the floor to find the right position but of course, this didn’t simulate the swing i would experience. Nevertheless, once i’d ripped my finger open and decided to call it a day, i was pretty happy with my efforts: session success indeed.

The following day was less climbing orientated and by the time i finally headed out of the door with Tess in tow, the ground was wet and the sun shortly to set. So instead of taking pads, i just took a guidebook and went exploring a project in the back of my mind for a while: Lizard King in the pass.

There are two versions listed in the old guide: a V10 straight up through some slanting shelves and small crimps up to a letterbox hold and a lower V8 version from the crimps onto a finger-jug rail to finish in the same place.

I haven’t been sure whether to add these to The List so went on a scouting mission. Lizard King High as i’ve heard it known does seem the better line but with a wild swing at the top and while falling straight down would be without serious consequence, to come off during the swing would invite a long tumble down the hill. So for now, i’ll just try the low version. That, for me, would certainly constitute a good session.

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