Tag Archives: bas cuvier

Milestones: 2011

This is part three of a series of posts all about the turning points in my climbing career. From single moves to huge time spans, these are the events that shaped me into the climber and person i am today. 

I’ll be posting a new one every few days so keep an eye on the blog for the latest or, if not, they will appear in one beast of an article at the end of the series. Feel free to comment and let me know of some of your own highlights, i’d greatly enjoy hearing some of your own. 

2011

Carefully placed pads on a rising traverse

They say your school years are the best years of your life. Well mine were shit. The best year of my life followed a slightly obscure path after the death of my Grandmother.

With Grandma on her deathbed, her youngest son, now living in Thunder Bay, Canada, came to pay his respects. Not I nor my cousins had ever met him and so, while tinged with some sadness, this event became a golden opportunity to forge a friendship with a distant relative.

In a weird way, i think it rekindled the relationship between my Uncle Andrew and my father and our two families kept in touch, predominantly through Skype. Before long, i’d managed (somehow, through the generosity of the family) to fenagle myself a plane ticket to Canada.

Wolf Mountain said they wanted to use this shot to show to their students to demonstrate good footwork!

Not content to wait for my summer trip, in March i made my now-annual pilgrimage to Fontainebleau, this time in the company of good friend Mike Pinches. Mike is a similarly sociable guy and on day one, at Cul de Chien, we made friends with a Canadian couple and a Swedish couple. Plans with Steve and MC were made to hook up in June, as they lived about an hour north of my intended destination of Vancouver, and Facebook details were shared with Fredrik and Karin. We then went on to have a stunning  week – my best to that point in the forest.

Canada was, as was hoped, the trip of a lifetime and to date, the only excursion out of Europe. Two weeks helped to forge a lifetime friendship and i will always be indebted to Simon for his kindness and generosity. While hard ticks didn’t happen, the experience was unforgettable and this in itself would easily make the list. The reason it hasn’t is what happened ten weeks after my return.

With two foreign trips already in the bag that year, and one of them to the other side of the world, i was quite content to stay in the UK for my Autumn week off, and was planning to go back to the Lakes for a bit of a tour. With a week to go, i had a look at the long term forecast and it did not look good.

Now love Facebook or hate it, it has it’s uses and i put a post on asking for suggestions for suitable destinations at short notice. Soon, there was a reply from Fredrik, championing his local area, more in jest i suspect in hindsight.

 

Bouldering on the fantastic island of Hönö I got home on the Tuesday and frantically messaged him to ask if he was serious. Wednesday, without hearing a reply, i sent another message to say i hoped so as i’d just booked my flights. Thursday i packed, Friday i left and Saturday afternoon, i arrived to a slightly shocked Swede and five days of bouldering bliss.

It spawned what has become a tradition: an exchange, if you will, with one of us visiting the other annually, taking it in turns, with the fifth visit due later this year. In 2014 i even had the privilege to attend their wedding.

The latter trip would also easily make the list on it’s own but the fact that all three landed inside the same calender year (if you’ll pardon the hypocrisy from the opening paragraphs in the intro) combine to make 2011 the one i will always remember.

Milestones: Carnage 7b+

This is part two of a series of posts all about the turning points in my climbing career. From single moves to huge time spans, these are the events that shaped me into the climber and person i am today. 

I’ll be posting a new one every few days so keep an eye on the blog for the latest or, if not, they will appear in one beast of an article at the end of the series. Feel free to comment and let me know of some of your own highlights, i’d greatly enjoy hearing some of your own. 

Carnage 7b+

Giving it my all, which wasn't enough. March 2011
Giving it my all, which wasn’t enough. March 2011

It has long been said (and will long be assumed) that bouldering lacks the feeling and emotion of other forms of climbing; that it does not compare to the sense of topping out a mountain or a big wall after prolonged periods of effort. Anyone who says that will not have experienced what i did on a mild day in March 2014.

Given 7b by some, it didn’t even rate as the hardest graded problem at the time but was certainly leaps and bounds above problems of the same grade already ticked: Left Wall Traverse, The Sting or Ongle Jo, a climb i’d done just the day before. While Ongle Jo took a session, Carnage took an age.

My first try was when working on the neighbouring Helicopter back in 2007. While this wasn’t a serious effort, it was certainly when the seed was planted. It was in 2010 (i think) that i really started to give it some serious attention.

Plas du Curvier, Fontainebleau, France. Another crag with an abundance of importance in climbing history that receives a fraction of the attention of Yosemite
Plas du Curvier, Fontainebleau, France. Another crag with an abundance of importance in climbing history that receives a fraction of the attention of Yosemite

To be honest, i can’t remember exactly when i was on it properly for the first session, nor can i remember how many sessions (let alone efforts) i’d put it by the time it relented. What i do know is that when i rocked up in March 2011, i thought i was close and was sat underneath it for a good portion of the week.

The winter of 2013-14 was when i realised i had to do something different – simply going back to try again, hoping for that little bit more wasn’t going to work. had to work. I trained, for the first time, specifically for the problem, doing dead hangs on holds that matched those i knew so well but struggled to hold. Pull ups on similar holds, sessions on sling trainers and rings to work relevant muscle groups, even a project-specific problem at the Beacon.

By the time i returned, i knew i was ready but wouldn’t know how ready until it was over. Cuvier was scheduled for early in the week, day two or three i think, and while the others continued on the blue circuit i was using to warm up, i quietly left.

Fontainebleau

It took three efforts. The first i fell from shock at being able to hold on so well. The second was over enthusiasm. I sat, breathed, calmed myself, ignored all around me, strangers all. Still shaking slightly, i stepped up and sent.

Years of effort, obsession, commuting while running through the moves in my head, training and work like never before, the emotion got to me. Once the screaming had subsided , i sat atop the block letting it sink in. It was over, after all this time and i began to cry. Softly, i sat on top that boulder for ten minutes, unable to get off thanks to shaking limbs and teary eyes. I can still tell you every hold, every muscle that aches and when nearly eighteen months later and i wager i still will for quite some time to come.

To say bouldering lacks emotion is to be short sighted. To say it’s lacks time and effort is naive. Big walls and Greater Ranges can take weeks or months, granted but true bouldering, at the true limit of your capabilities can take years. When it does, the rewards can be so much greater.