Tag Archives: cromlech boulders

Presently Looking to the Future

I wasn’t expecting to post any time soon but when there’s a session like my last one, i’d be foolish not to document it. I keep prattling on about the heatwave of late and i truly got the chance to reap the benefits, at the Cromlech boulders no less. After nearly a ten year wait, the landing under James Pond at the famous roadside boulders was finally dry.

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Finally, after probably about ten years of waiting, James Pond was possible after the longest dry spell I remember meant you didn't need wellies to get to the start… What a session that turned out to be: a 7a flash, a 7b/+ tick and a host of other excellent #bouldering that I'd honestly never done before. I've been waiting a long time for this and save for attack of the midge, might have had just enough left in me for #jamespond sit start too. What's more, you really can't argue with the setting (proximity to the road notwithstanding) – not many places you get to climb under the shadow of #dinascromlech And #dinasmot! #cromlech #cromlechboulders #worldclasswales #snowdonianationalpark #snowdon #northwales #northwalesbouldering #rockclimbing #escalade #escalada #grimpeur #climbing #climbing_is_my_passion #climbing_lovers #climbing_pictures_of_instagram #meclimbing

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Granted, it’s not really been ten years and i’m sure it’s been dry in that period; it just didn’t happen to fall right for me or i didn’t end up there. Either way though, it is NOT common, being the lowest part of ground following the run off from the Glyderau high above. Now, finally, with a dog free evening and not a huge amount of free time, was my chance.

I took it with open arms and a grateful smile. A repeat of Moose’s Problem 5c/6a and the sit start at 6b+ were a great place to start, being so fun the first time around. After that, The Slopes 6b proved to be significantly better than i’d first thought, before heading into the cave proper.

After all this time, i was a little sad to flash James Pond 7a, although after my send of Cross Fader the other day, it did help to flash another at the same grade. At least it wasn’t soft! Bog Traverse 6b+ also put up little resistance and was excellent, before a first attempt at linking them with Bog Pond 7a+. Shocked by the success, it did mean i could get my teeth into the James Pond sit start either at 7b/+ or a little lower giving 7b+ proper. The former was done on the third attempt, the latter left for another day once the midge descended…

I’m not sure if it was this session, the recent spate of outdoor ticks or seeing my Top Ten Yearly Average creep up yet again, but something has lit a fire under my backside. I’ve never been one for training very well, lacking the mental discipline. Now, it has dawned on me that the only time i’ve been able to knuckle down and train is for a specific problem. So i’ve come up with a plan.

Goal: 8a. With a small ream of A3 paper and a pen – only one colour for a change – i’ve written not only the new list (photo on instagram imminent) but also five steps to achieving the next magic grade. My logbook shows two 7c+ after Love Pie was upgraded in the New Testament and that extra little bit of number has spurred me on. To climb 8a given my track record, experience and past would be good. to do it with two young children would be mighty impressive.

I’ve listed eleven of them to start with; next step is to scout them out and slowly whittle the selection down to one. Watch this space.

In the meantime, despite a dry evening, i’m heading for the Indy. It’s the first time i’ve been since they dismantled and rebuilt the famous central boulder and to be honest, i’m itching to see what it’s like now.

Any time i pass up an outdoor session in favour of an indoor one, i question what the fuck i’m doing but i think sometimes it is a sensible thing to do. This morning it rained solidly for five or siix hours, and it would be worthwhile to go and get 8a advise from some strong boys who’ve actually gone and done it.

Moreover, the Indy isn’t just a local climbing wall, it’s a local hub for boulderers, wads and general climby types and to be honest, i have missed it. Justified or otherwise, sometimes it’s important to forget what you should be doing and just do what you want to. The list of projects will still be there.

With Germany in jeopardy – the trip, i’m sure the country is fine – in could be timely to be thinking of things a little closer to home. I wouldn’t like to say that i’ve never been so close to the departure date while still not being 100% sure we’re even going but i certainly haven’t been in this situation often and definitely am not enjoying it. The Land Rover, which was to be transporting us, is still suffering mechanical problems and is out as an option and Em’s Berlingo isn’t filling me with masses of hope.

Only time will tell if all goes ahead and on schedule. Not a lot of time either: at time of writing, we leave home in about two days.

We have been discussing backup plans and a city break is on the cards, although i mentioned to Em that i’d be loathe to chose somewhere i’d later want to go for a June climbing trip. Nevertheless, the Iceland football team has really inspired me and i’m now itching to go. Perhaps a last minute change is possible but i’d rather collect up some strong lads and head over with a bit of a crew. June would be ideal and from what i’ve read, might be a good time to try.

With the present looking uncertain, perhaps focusing on the future could brighten my spirits. Who knows. I just hope when i look back on this year, wherever we head that there will be just reason for it to be remembered in many years to come.

Link to awesome Iceland bouldering article: here.

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Looking Up, Looking Forward

My focus has seemed to shift slightly since my last post. After that great period of send after send, i couldn’t put the other important things off any more and had to do a bit of work on the house.

A fortnight after my Dog Crack success, and after boarding the loft, it was time for a coaching session with my excellent and long term student. After recovering from injury, this was one of our first sessions for quite some time and as such, we headed up to The Barrel.

Without going into the details of the session, it was interesting to get stuck in to some of the other new problems around what was, before the New Testament, a crag i’d pretty much ticked off. Just below the famous Barrel proper lies another, slightly high, boulder that now plays home to half a dozen problems or link ups.

Admittedly there were some that involved trying not to scrape your arse across the floor but overall, these have been worthwhile additions to the area. While i’m not sure they justify a star for each problem, Baby Barrel 6a, Baby Roof 6a and OLD Finish 6a+ should all get a few minutes of anyone’s attention on their way up that way.

Ever since then, my climbing focus has been firmly on our upcoming trip to Germany. Assuming we get there…

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The #heatwave we've been experiencing, coupled with our impending #adventure has reminded me of my last extended stay in #Germany – what became known as the Ill Fated Trip Of 2013. The keen eyed among you will notice in the last picture the bonnet of the Freelander is up as the mechanical problems began. The first one is one of the very few #climbing photos I have of that week, taken on a timer as I was there with only Tess for company on our first #camping trip away. No idea where I was out what I was on. All I know is that we were in the #Frankenjura. It wasn't great. 40 degree heat probably didn't help. The middle photo though is probably one of my favourite #outdoor photos ever. Don't know why but I love the #juxtaposition of the green tree canopy with the brown floor, with the blue adding something extra. It's a simple shot but I like it. #bouldering #boulderingisbetter #bouldering_pictures_of_instagram #rockclimbing #grimpeur #escalade #escalada #climbing_is_my_passion #climbing_pictures_of_instagram

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Friday gone and i received a text from my better half saying her car was not in fit shape. She called my dad, my expert mechanic consultant, who came to have a look and arranged for it to go into the garage. I’m glad he was at our place, too, as on my way home, the thermometer on the Land Rover hit max, a bad smell appeared and steam rose from the bonnet. After nose-diving into the nearest available space, it was obvious to anyone the radiator had gone, as boiling hot water sprung from the front of the car in a jet.

Long story short, three eggs in the rad didn’t work – it’s not a myth, it can work for small holes – and i was towed home. Friday night is a bad night to break down, and despite ordering the parts that night, it was Wednesday afternoon before the new one finally arrived.

I took two extra days off work (thankful for a quiet weekend) and slowly drove myself nuts at not being able to leave the village. Family time was awesome but there’s something about not being able to do something that puts it at the forefront of your mind.

Step forward the wonderful Mr Dan Webb. Despite spending his whole day in the Ogwen valley and living half an hour away from me, Dan drove over to my house, picked me up and together with Alice from work, we headed out to the boulders. It was significantly better than an hour walk into Pac Man!

With no dog and all of us having had a busy day already, the Cromlech boulders were an obvious choice. Much as i’ve never been that keen on them and think them over-rated, there’s no denying the quantity of problems there and the grade range is huge. What’s more, following this extended hot spell, there was an outside chance some of the soggier landings would’ve dried up slightly.

I was half right and our focal point was the Heel Hook Traverse 6b. With Dan wanting something to get his teeth into and Alice certainly capable, not to mention the ground being less than usually saturated, it was a good choice and almost yielded a send or two. After a rest, i have faith in them both.

We trundled around some of the other boulders, collecting more than a dozen problems for myself, before my colleagues declared themselves done for the day. After having seen the latest edition of Girl Crush (see below) i was eager to try what looked like an awesome climb: Cross Fader given 6c in the film but 7a in the guidebook.

It’s not 7a. Irrespective of using my own abilities to grade, it felt soft for even 6b. Maybe it was just my style – admittedly that is true, it suited me – but the handholds were solid and the footholds were huge! How it has got that grade i’ll never know. It was an easy flash and just to be sure, i repeated it just as easily.

Hopefully it bodes well for Odenwald; the lesser known area in the North West of Germany that i am still clinging to the hope of getting to in a little over a week. I bought the guide back in 2013, with no idea where it actually was, and have now found it is an ideal place to head to en route to the Alps.

I can’t actually find anything about it at all and any online search for “Mannheim bouldering” yields nothing but indoor walls – not exactly what you’d travel several hundred miles for! Still, i was chatting to a customer at work who knew the area and said it was worthwhile. I’m sure i’ve been to worse.

Then it’s south, heading for Garmisch-Partenkirchen. I don’t know much about the area, can find next to no nearby bouldering, but it is a typical climber’s town, famed for it’s Alpine mountains and ice climbing. I can’t wait, and am desperately hoping we can still make it despite our mechanical woes.

The Long Awaited New Testament

It’s here.

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I've been waiting a very long time for this. Not just me, many people both local and elsewhere around the world and you know what, it's been totally worth the wait. It does have some weight to it: nearly 700 pages means it nearly doubles the mass of my #climbing bag but what that means is there are SOOOOOO many new places to explore; places I never really knew existed, places I knew of but didn't know what was there, places I know well with extra new lines to throw myself at. Makes it even sweeter for me that I'm in it! Not a photo but my lines in Bryn Engan! #stoked Here's to a summer of #bouldering in #worldclasswales #northwalesbouldering #bouldering #guidebook #book #climbing_pictures_of_instagram

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It has been a long time coming, for anyone wanting to boulder in North Wales; that’s quite a number of people given it is up there as a contender for the best bouldering in Britain! The last guide was originally published in 2004, in moody black and white and was actually bilingual, with everything being given descriptions in Welsh (Cymraeg) as well as English. It went out of print back in 2009 and has been a prized possession for anyone lucky enough to lay their hands on one – something not to be loaned or lost for sure! – until now.

For some context, the old guide was 303 pages and (as well as half of it being duplicated already) contained the usual general pages, commandments for bouldering outdoors, two pages on gear, another on landings, four pages on the definition of a boulder problem (worth a read) and another three on grading. At the back, once past the faraway crag of Cae Ddu, you’d find a FULL graded list of everything in the book, eight colour photos including one of the great John Gaskins and SIXTEEN pages on history of the local scene. Oh and a glossary.

All that is gone, save for four pages of introduction; such is the nature of the North Wales bouldering explosion since the last guide first hit the shelves some thirteen years ago. In fairness, it had to as the weighty tome that now covers my homeland extensively still comes in at 667 pages. It weighs 1150g, almost half the weight of my daughter when she was born…

The old classics are in there, obviously but with entire new crags that only the most dedicated of locals were aware of. Nevertheless, with almost every crag at the very least giving a photo topo for an old project for me, and after years of deliberation, i’ve opted to go for a No Retro Ticks approach to the guide.

I was chatting to an old friend Andy Marshall the other day and said about this so just to clarify: No Retro Ticks refers simply to literally ticking the guidebook, not claiming the ascent. What this means in real terms is that there is a lot of repeating of boulder problems around here for me all of a sudden!

That’s not to mean i’m going to leave a lot of the new stuff. On the contrary, unable to wait for the delivery at work, i snagged a copy from local shop V12 (often called VDiff) the day it arrived and was out the following day checking out somewhere i’d been before but not climbed.

I love doing established boulder problems, with beta and a grade and i love doing first ascents but what i really don’t like is doing something that i know has been done but i don’t know how or how hard. I find it really irritating and more than once i’ve done something slightly different from the original and don’t quite get the ascent. There have been a few places like that around here but all of a sudden, i have a book that now shows me where they lie.

The first crag on my radar? The first crag in the book! Little walk in, dog friendly and oft pondered, i headed into Fachwen to get some much needed mileage under my belt.

A great little session culminating in Shorter’s Roof 7a+ while listening to the Test cricket. More than getting back into the swing of things, it was liberating to actually climb something i’d looked at years ago but was put off by not knowing enough detail. That and it’s a great little roof.

The only other ticks in the book were up in the pass where i managed to sneak out for a couple of hours. The Llanberis Pass has always been the focal point of the North Wales bouldering scene and has suddenly expanded, somewhat unexpectedly. One would’ve thought it couldn’t get much else new but it really has.

The Obedience Boulders are one such area that weren’t really known before but now have photo topos and provide a quick session for those nearby. Most people will be lured to the nearby Corridors Of Power 7c+ but i would suggest Nicotine Wall and it’s surrounding problems would be worth stopping at on the way there.

Sadly, despite obsessively reading the book at every opportunity, that remains my only outdoor sessions to date; stymied by poor weather and a baby, not to mention moving house. What we have mentioned though are some excellent scouting missions.

The crag of Fontainefawr was another i’d heard plenty about but not visited so an evening walk turned quickly into bushwacking and searching in the woods to find the inspiring hanging roof. It did look mighty impressive but for me, didn’t quite hit the spot and would most definitely not be baby friendly.

The one that did push my buttons was Supercrack. Under the heading of the Black Rhino boulder – a less inspiring but equally tempting boulder – Supercrack has captivated my attention since i first laid eyes on it in person. Despite the rain, the bottom half remained chalked and i really cannot wait for a dry spell to get back there and get spat off the harder (and hopefully not the easier) lines.

It looked inspiring in a recent video that caught my attention too but that wasn’t why i was watching. Long time readers will remember the excitement i felt after completing my best first ascent, Prowess 7b. So imagine my excitement when i watched this video:

It is a great feeling to put up a new line, even better to see it in the guidebook but to know that people are out there climbing it is a real thrill. What’s even better is a conversation i had the other day with the boys at Dragon Holds.

After recognising the woods of Bryn Engan in a photo, and a comment saying they were searching for new boulders, i asked if it was where i thought. The reply: “You know where it is, near Pyb boulder and prowess”. Not only are people now trying my climb, they’re also using it as a landmark!

It might sound a little sad but it’s nice to think that while this new book is giving me so much inspiration and new climbs to throw myself at, that i’ve been a little part of that.

Solstice: Goal Setting Time Again

A whole month since my last post just goes to highlight quite how little has been going on for me lately, although there have been a few notable climbing-related activities – most notably on the coaching front.

After a break from coaching over the summer (due to distractions like baby-related fussing and DIY) i’ve got back into it recently, slowly remembering what to do and culminating last weekend on attending the BMC Coaching Symposium in Manchester. It was a fantastic experience, from Kris Peters talking about strength and conditioning training to Udo Neumann and his movement workshops, with plenty more as well. It has relit the fire that had burned very brightly to begin with to progress as a coach rather than a climber and has led to some deeper thinking and understanding of climbing since then. I will look to write up some of these ideas and publish them soon.

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"We always think the questions that surround us are the most important" It's quite common to meet your #heroes in the #climbing world but it's pretty rare to meet someone who instantly becomes one. This is Udo Neumann: he's coached the German national team and is one of the front runners in current #coaching theory. Here he's giving the keynote speech at the @teambmc Coaching Symposium at the Depot in Manchester yesterday. His thinking on movement in coaching is amazing, his methods incredible and he has the personality to boot. Such an amazing guy, I hope, as with all the others presenting on this awesome weekend, that our paths cross again very soon #bouldering #climbing_is_my_passion

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Other than that, my focus has been on getting back to vaguely the levels of strength i held back in March on that cold day at Sheep Pen and my career-high tick of 7c+. As such, any advances on outside climbing (despite the potentially dry conditions) have been ignored in favour of indoor cranking and a focus on training. A six-month pass at the Indy has helped drag me down more often and the advent of the aggregate has given me some much needed structure.

Where the List had acted as an inspiration, once my strength had dropped a little, i found that even the easiest lines on there had become too dificult and actually, it was becoming more detrimental than helpful. The best way to get back on track: get strong again.

The main issue, that i am sure most climbers can empathise with, is a niggling feeling in my right arm, from my elbow to to midriff. At the moment, i’m persevering carefully and praying it isn’t anything too serious.

Of course, this all leads nicely to today’s significant date: it’s the mid-season solstice!

Some Highlights

First though, it would be unfair to mention some of the highlights from the last six months. After all, there have been some huge ones!

On the climbing front, the Great Swedish Bouldering Tour will certainly sit as one of the greatest trips of all time. While there wasn’t too much in the way of actual climbing, the number of crags and variety of climbing was unprecedented and will live long in the memory  – there is too much to think of quickly here.

Meanwhile, while the week in Scotland again yielded a meagre amount of time on rock proper, a taste of Torridon was enough to remind me that while you don’t have to get on a boat or a plane to get to Scotland, it does not reduce it’s appeal at all – we need to go back. Emily will not complain.

And of course, the biggest news of all: the onset of fatherhood come late February. I’m not sure what to say about it, other than i cannot wait. This is something i’ve wanted for many years and i’m thrilled that not only is it now actually going to happen, i’ve found the perfect person for it to happen with. Even if becoming a father meant an end to my climbing career, it would be worth it but i don’t think anyone would put money on that outcome happening. Far more likely is for me to have a willing and budding apprentice… Only time will tell what will happen but whatever that is, it’s going to be amazing.

Clocks Fall Back

This weekend, the clocks have gone back an hour, meaning several things: firstly, any ideas of daylight after-work sessions are now firmly out for the next few months and of course meaning we are now exactly half-way through the yearly cycle.

That means it’s time to review the last goals, find out how well (or poorly) i’ve done and set some more for the next season. Of course, with this being only the solstice and not the New Year, there are still some outstanding, which is ideal, giving me some continuity. So let’s start by looking at the goals set for Summer 2016

Last Season’s Goals:
  • Three 8a climbs
  • At least 7c abroad
  • More first ascents and a comprehensive topo
  • SPA Assessment
And how did it go?

Erm, yeah, not great, reading that little list! but not that bad either.

Three problems at 8a was always going to be an impossible ask but i knew that when i wrote it; it was more a case of trying to spur myself on. To be honest though, psyche levels fell dramatically mid-season and unless i’d maintained the improvment i’d seen over the previous 18 months, it was never going to happen.

Psyche levels wax and wane regularly with climbing and continually being completely keen to get out all the time is not sustainable. The trick with these things is to accept that sometimes, you just need a break from it all and running with that. Getting the news that i’m having a baby probably affected me too (not that i’d change that for the world but you know what i mean).

Likewise, even booking onto an SPA Assessment proved a step too far, although i think i underestimated quite how difficult a step this would be for me. The true fact is that once i’ve ticked that box, my rack and my ropes will doubtless be going deep into the back of the loft – such is my dislike of trad climbing. Don’t get me wrong, i see the appeal but for me, it is something i no longer wish to pursue and thankfully, these days i don’t have to. This one is going to be a much tougher task that i’d thought.

But it’s not all doom and gloom. 7c abroad did indeed go this season, with success on Carnage assis 7c of all things. It was slightly tactical but almost didn’t pay off and did cost me far more of my week than i had intended. Nevetheless, by picking the extended version of a line i know so intimately, i gave myself a real fighting chance and did indeed manage to tick off this particular milestone.

Meanwhile, a late-season surge on the boulders in Bryn Engan meant that more first ascents did arrive… sort of. To be honest, the problems on the Bryn Engan boulder were all probably climbed many moons ago but not recorded, meaning i’m not actually thinking they’re first ascents proper. Instead, i’m claiming first recorded ascent of five lines; the pick of the bunch being Awaiting Arthur’s Arrival 7a+ – a sligtly convoluted link up line but a good one nonetheless.

The comprehensive topo hasn’t happened though. Decent photographs are certainly needed, with time to actually create and edit something that will stand up to the rigours of the navigation of boulderers. Still, i’ve seen and heard of Prowess and the lines of the Mymbyr Boulder going in the new guide. To be honest, that’s far more of a coup than my own little scribblings!

So, about fifty per cent of the objectives done probably gives a fair assessment of my levels of success. Given the dip in psyche and ability during the latter half of the season, i’m not going to complain!

2016 Winter Goals

At the “turn of the year” i’d even set some Winter goals: train weaknesses, harness strengths and create a training plan. Hmm.

These are all worthy goals but i suspect possibly don’t quite go far enough. True they are excellent focal points but more is needed if i’m to get back to ticking the goals i’ve missed to date.

8a is still atainable, if i can find the right one. An SPA is again achieveable, despite it being winter. A topo will take a few days at a computer. Still, more things are needed and life has certainly changed substantially since that post in the latter days of March.

2016 Autumn/Winter Goals – short term

Get strong. Get back in training. Get the psyche back! That has to be the key and is already on the cards as i continue to tick off the problems at the Indy on my little sheet. My focus at the moment has to get to a point where the List is inspirational and not demoralising and if i can’t do that, it needs redrawing – it is currently detrimental.

Getting back into coaching is a must too. Granted, three sessions a week may have represented an incessent and unsustainable surge of enthusiasm – and possibly a hint that i was more single than i’d realised – but getting back in the wall with that different head on is now just as important to me as a climber.

  • Get strong and create that training plan.
  • Coach regularly
  • Keep on top of the aggregate
  • 7c outside – most likely Nazgul’s Traverse

2016 Autumn/Winter goals – season long

That SPA Assessment needs to happen; i’m gonna have to suck it up at some point, although don’t be surprised to see this one on my to-do list at the end of next March too.

Meanwhile, the aggregate remains a strong priority for me. I have mentioned in a previous post that my final standing of fourth last year may have been akin to Leicester winning the Premier league so a reasonable aim may be to finish top-5 this time around. This should do it, as long as i’m not too upset if it doesn’t happen.

As mentioned above, leaving 8a on there isn’t beyond the realms of possibility but reigning it in from three to one is probably wise given the dip i’ve had. I’ll come back just as strong, if i truly want to, but there’s no point getting carried away and if i do tick off one, i’m not going to suddenly stop because i’ve achieved that goal.

Finally, my coaching needs to develop a little more into a structured activity if i’m to continue heading in the direction i want it to. I’ve been reading lots about coaching in other sports and this is not bad thing. Next is to consolidate my thinking, come up with some tangible points and create a coaching philosophy. Do this, and i’ll be setting myself up nicely for the future.

  • SPA Assessment
  • Top Five in the Indy Aggregate
  • At least one 8a climb
  • Create a coaching philosophy

Awaiting Athur’s Arrival wasn’t just a route name plucked out of the back of my mind because it sounds good. At the back end of the coming season, my first offspring will be here and everything WILL change. While this isn’t necessarily the end, or indeed a bad thing at all, it does mean this is possibly my last chance to climb and train as i’ve known it in the past. It’s important to make the most of it – and enjoy it too!

Perhaps there’s a lesson in there for all of us? Whatever you’re up to this Winter, have a great time and the Very Best of Psyche To You!

Merry Solstice!

Pre Tournament Friendly

Well that was unexpected! I spent most of yesterday pondering what to do with myself; play football, go climbing, or bum around and wait for a barbeque on behalf of the Fast Trackers at work, i couldn’t make up my mind. My mind flitted back and forth for hours, much to Em’s dismay as i refused to commit to a decision.

At about five o’clock, i bumped into Alex Cutbush from work and immediately asked what he was doing this evening. When i said to come for a climb, he was keen and my mind was finally made up. Soon after, we were in the Landy heading to Rhiw Goch.

There will undoubtedly always be things to get done at Rhiw Goch – the grades range from Gap of Rohan 6c right up to Poppy’s Move 8a+ with a good spread in between. There’s then plenty of scope nearby for other new lines on nearby blocks. It’s also conveniently close to work and a great option for an after work blast.

So it was a good option, with two good problems from The List: Nazgul’s Traverse and Badgers In The Mist both 7c. I’ve spoken a lot recently about Badgers so i won’t go into it any more than to say it was there waiting for me to go back. So, after a repeat of Gap… and Ride the Wild Smurf stand at 7a from a fractionally lower start than normal, we got on to the projects. For Alex, this was Moria 7b which would’ve been his first.

And he was close too. I had a few efforts in the interests or warming up and actually found myself cruising up with relative ease – yet another thing to raise the optimism levels for next week! Most importantly the style was really good; smooth, careful, no cutting loose, it went really well. But of course, this was Alex’s project and on something like his second go, he almost nailed it.

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Another one for last night and almost more impressive than my own tick at #rhiwgoch – this is @alexcutbush working #moria 7b. He was really close on the one attempt, and a sterling #effort it was too, considering his top grade so far is 7a+ And that's the thing with #climbing: it's entirely personal. Me getting a fifth 7c wouldn't be anywhere near as impressive in my eyes as Alex breaking a new grade, and that would be the same at any level. It's all relative, something I hammer home when coaching and something every climber, no matter what grade they #climb should always remember. #inspiration #worldclasswales #snowdonia #northwales #northwalesbouldering #bouldering #rockclimbing #climbing_photos_of_instagram #climbing_pictures_of_instagram #climbing_is_my_passion #meclimbing @plasybreninstaff

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It’s a weird problem, Moria, in that it’s definitely flashable but at the same time, very easily dropped. It really was a great effort by Alex and he was so close, i felt sure, if he could nail that first move again, he’d have gone and ticked off a new grade – always something that requires respect.

Sadly, it didn’t go for him and we quickly thrust the pads under Badgers… for my first effort at the sit start proper. I’ve half-tried it before and found it utterly desperate and this time was no different – i couldn’t get off the floor! After getting frustrated and pissed off, i sulked slightly and shuffled the pads under Nazgul’s…

This one is even worse and i couldn’t figure out a sequence at all. I got completely shut down and didn’t stay on it long. After offering to move the pads back for Alex (to which he politely declined) i figured i’d have another blast on the other 7c.

I had a quick look at some video beta from the first ascent and found the foot sequence was slightly different to what i’d been doing and there was a mild twist of the hips. It was only the first two moves that were blocking me so i figured i’d try this new beta. First effort, i nailed the first move.

All of a sudden, a problem that looked like it would take me months suddenly opened up and looked like it might go. A quick shuffle of the pads, some tactical positioning of my spotter and soon the second move fell too, although my feet slipped off. So close, i was shocked.

I opted for a quick fag-break rest but when it went out, i took that as a sign and got on it again. Slap, boom, first move stuck and then a throw out left and i was still on. Alex directed (verbally) my heel onto the good hold and i slowly reached through to the lip-jug, matched and was on the exit jugs, my heel above my head to the right, my head leaning backwards to see the trees and the sky inverted in the distance. I topped it out and looked down, utterly shocked. Here was a problem that looked well out of my short term ability and one that had caused me so much consternation recently that had suddenly yielded.

So good prep indeed! A bit achy but still in one piece, i was thrilled at my choice, and equally thrilled for my friend that new ground for him may soon be broken – more so than i’d realised! for this evening, while i was in the middle of the opening paragraphs of this very post, i discovered he’d gone and done his first V8: Ultimate Retro Party at the Cromlech Boulders.

I am genuinely super chuffed for him – he’s a great guy and deserves the plaudits. I’m sure this won’t be the first and that Moria will fall for him very soon as well. Hopefully we’ll get out and get more done over the summer!

Distractions

Well that was a quiet start to the New Year! And an unexpected one if i’m honest! Writing that last post, and with various trips penned and in the pipeline for year ahead, i thought i’d be chomping at the bit to get out and get climbing but, what with injuries and other distractions, i seemed to lose psyche for a week or two there.

Sometimes psyche and enthusiasm do take a bit of a hit – you simply can’t maintain a constant level of desperation to get out forever (or i can’t anyway). So i’ve not really done much in the last few weeks, as shown on my instagram feed and a series of old photos replacing anything new and exciting.

There are a couple of exceptional sessions though; mainly on Diesel Power 8a at the Cromlech Boulders, once in daylight on the way home and the other Tuesday gone. Neither were particularly anything to write home about – hence the lack of writing – merely to point out how hard this project is going to be.

It’s a unique problem really: the crimp handholds being reasonable, especially for the grade of climb! The crux seems to be entirely in the feet and keeping them on the smoothly polished holds using intense body tension that i seem to be lacking. Far too often, when trying to move anything at all, or even sometimes when simply trying to hold the position i find myself in, my feet will inexplicably part company with the rock, bringing me down to the pad with a thud.

Meanwhile, under the near-horizontal roof sits another bloc – one trodden by many thousands of feet to walk around and stand atop this roadside boulder; tourists wanting to summit something and get a feeling for the outdoors. The problem is that this rock underneath you is quite close behind and until you are reaching the exit moves, there is zero chance of cutting loose. It crossed my mind that if that boulder didn’t lie so close beneath you, this classic would probably be a full grade easier.

So you set up on any of the hard moves and pull on only to find your feet sliding off and you returning back to sit on the pad (assuming your pad hasn’t moved down the slope but thankfully, this seems fairly rare). It is undoubtedly one of the most frustrating and annoying problems i’ve ever encountered and one that will take some intense training, i fear.

Not to mention multiple sessions but the important bit of that is they need to be productive sessions and these last two really didn’t fit into that category. The daytime session taught me nothing i didn’t already know other than i’m still quite a way off from this project and that i was not in condition to be getting on something at the limit of my abilities. Such is the nature of roadside boulders though – they’re very tempting when you’ve not got much time… or inclination for that matter.

Such was the situation Pablo found himself in this week when he finished work late and headed into the Pass for a quick blast. Completely dark with cloud cover clouding any moon or star light, i noticed his lamp under Jerry’s Roof from quite a way away, slowing to see who was keen on my way past. When i noticed my good friend, i had to stop.

I watched as he tried Bus Stop 7b+ several times, this time making the first moves with relative ease before struggling after the crux, he moved onto Bus Stop RH 7c and i joined him before we both headed up to Diesel Power. To be fair though, while i struggled to make any gains, seeing how much Pablo struggled with any move at all did make me realise i’m a lot closer than recent sessions had led me to believe.

Considering my recent unintentional abstinence from climbing, partially to rest the two hip injuries i’d sustained in recent weeks, perhaps i’m being a bit hard on myself. With a Font trip looming, it had occurred that i might be out of shape when i get to the forest too and so, the smallest amount of rain convincing me that i was justified not going outside, i took a trip to the Indy on Sunday gone, with the express intention of seeing how well i’d do in a session.

Turns out it was quite well, and better than i was expecting! A flash on a 7b (albeit one that suited but it certainly didn’t feel hard!) and very close on a 7c filled me with enthusiasm. I had another session the following evening when i found myself there for some coaching that felt like i had no energy at all, granted but even then, said 7c still fell. Perhaps my hard ticklist for the forest may not be that ambitious after all?

So now, local projects have taken a back seat. A major back seat – imagine sticking them upstairs at the back of a double decker bus. Focus is now entirely making sure i’m in the best possible shape for the end of next week when i make the familiar drive through two of Europe’s busiest cities overnight. I’m so excited, especially to be climbing there with one of the few friends who would make the invite-to-my-wedding list [an imaginary list to distinguish my closest friends] who is also ticking around the same grade as myself.

It’s impossible to know how a trip is going to turn out but you always get a bit of an inkling and this one feels pretty good. The politics and troubles setting up have been and gone and now the path looks clear and my mind is just waiting to be there now. This, along with the other trips of the year, seem to have encompassed every ounce of thought in my head lately – to the extent that, to my eternal shame, i forgot my parent’s wedding anniversary this week. I feel terrible about it and hope that they can forgive me, being the ones that instilled the wanderlust that drives me so much of the year. Maybe one year, i’ll get to take them too; not so much for climbing but just to experience an area of the world so beautiful and magical. I hope so, as they took me to experience so many places in my life, it would be an honour to repay such kindness one day.

They have a lot to answer for in this aspect of my life, my parents. And i will forever be grateful for that.

8 Points Dropped

It’s a funny old crag the Cromlech boulders: it has some really excellent aspects going for it but at the same time is an utter bag of shit. It’s also undoubtedly the most popular bouldering venue in North Wales.

There are dozens of problems within a few seconds of the road, some of them of exquisite quality – definite three-star classics – and while i’m not advocating missing problem like The Ramp V1, The Edge Problem V6, the Cromlech Roof Crack V6 or Jerry’s Roof V9, i do like to try and tempt people from these little blocs.

My theory is that there are boulderers out there who have climbed Rampless at V8 on the roadside boulders but are yet to even look at other classics at much lower grades (and much higher quality) such as King of Drunks V6 just a short slog up the hillside on the other side of the valley. And this despite the polish, the sharp holds and the incessant traffic that can often be more dangerous than a fall!

This has had a significant effect on the erosion at the crag as well. Let’s take The Edge Problem as our example, where the handholds for the standing start are now out of reach for all but the very tall stood atop stacked pads and the sitting start means your backside can no longer reach the floor. It’s something i find myself explaining to people regularly, such as the Sunday following my Porth Ysgo success.

Brimming with enthusiasm, but lacking anyone to go with, i looked through the list and was torn between the Barrel and making the big walk up to have a maiden effort on The Lotus V10. Either which way, i figured i’d have a warm up at the Cromlech, where the problems are a touch easier, and see if i could persuade anyone there to come somewhere, well, better!

As it turns out, that’s exactly what happened. As i turned out, i saw a girl topping out The Edge and then had to explain that she’d just ticked the V6 version and had no need to try it from any lower. Nevertheless, she said, she’d been working it from lower and wanted to finish it off – and full credit to her for that.

Within a few minutes, they asked what i was up to. When i mentioned the Barrel, pointed across the valley to it and found it in the guide, they opted to come with me! Success!

While nothing went for me, it was nice to have company and was great to see my two new friends ticking problems and relishing having somewhere new and fun to play on. The day ended with a hot chocolate in Pete’s Eats, as all good climbing sessions should.

But with a slight tweak in my right bicep, i opted to rest for a week or so, with a potential competition coming up the following Friday. I’d heard about the Beacon Boulder Bash for a while but wasn’t convinced until two of the Centre Assistants from work persuaded me to go along.

So competitions can work in many different ways: aggregate competitions last for months with no time limit on completion, timed comps with 5 minutes per problem and 5 minutes in between or a good old fashioned flash contest.

Normally, the flash contest can be pretty tough: 10 points for first attempt, 7 for second go, 3 for third and 1 point for hitting the bonus hold. For this one, though, they were slightly kinder, offering 10 points for a completed problem within three tries, 5 points for any completion thereafter and 3 for getting the bonus hold in control. It meant there was much more room for error, and more encouragement to keep trying things and stay till the end… and the after party!

In store for the winner? £100 cash prize, with other monetary prizes for second and third. The downside to this? A large group of very strong North Walean climbers came out the woodwork, keen to snaffle what would equate to a couple of days wages.

So despite psyching myself up on the drive in, convincing myself that i might be able to win this, as soon as i walked in the door and saw who was there, reality hit hard and i realised the only chance of going home with any cash was to start rummaging through everyone’s bags…

Anyway, it wasn’t about winning, but it wasn’t just about taking part; i wanted to do well by my own standards, to compete against myself, so to speak. Competitions can be very different beasts to just climbing without pressure and despite my best efforts over many years, i’ve never really got it right.

This time, though, it went very well. Out of a potential 300 points, i managed 239, dropping only 8 on problems i should’ve done better on. It was good enough for twelfth and those 8 points would’ve bumped me up another two places.

I can’t really complain about that to be honest, and i won’t – it was a great event, well arranged and well attended, with good problems and a great vibe. The winners worthy, the rest content and all told, a fantastic comp, well worth considering for next year.

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