Tag Archives: llanberis pass

A Single Session Send

After going on in my last post about success not being measured by sending problems, i only went and had a super sesh in the pass on Sunday!

Lizard King is a north walean classic 7c, much sought after and on many a climbers to-do list. I’d first had a look in July 2011 – and to be honest, i had didn’trealise it was that long ago until i literally just looked it up to type that! That would certainly explain why i’d not really given it much thought at the time; my hardest tick back then was a solitary 7b in Parisella’s Cave.

It does look a bit intimidating too, or would have then of course. After my scouting mission, it had seemed much more likely but as mentioned, the landing was worrying me slightly. So i’d opted to chuck the low version on the List at V8. After a day out at the beach with my family and the inlaws, it was the perfect venue for a quick blast.

To be true, i wasn’t that keen as i drove up there; sluggish and not entirely stoked for it. Then, as i was at the Cromlech boulders, i watched two pads walk their way along the bottom of the Pont y Cromlech slabs and reasoned they had to be  heading for the same spot. After all, there’s not much else there.

Turned out that they were actually heading for Emyr’s Arete 7a+, the climb i’d done when there all those years ago. They’d had a mammoth day, at the Milestone boulders, the RAC boulders, the Roadkill Block in the Gwynant valley and now here. Not bad for two climbers with only three legs between them!

They were the nicest guys – slightly unhinged in that brilliant way you often find with climbers. They were so enthusiastic and down to earth, it made me pretty glad to have made the short walk up.

They ticked off Emyr’s pretty quick only to look up at a hopeful me pointing at Lizard King Low. If truth be told, i’d only taken one pad with with me and the prospect of two more for a tenuous low traverse made me feel a little better. Moreover, these boys were barrels of fun.

Sadly, i hadn’t warmed up anywhere near enough and the tendons in my fingers were only just beginning to calm down their powerful screams as my companions decided to call it a (hugely successful) day, leaving me with some hard moves and a slightly grassy landing. Fair play to them though for joining me in the first place; they’d already bagged two V5, a V6 and two V7 at this stage! Now i’d persuaded them onto a V8 too. The call of an Indian takeaway was always going to be stronger than mine.

Not quite knowing what to do but only just being warm now, i figured i’d just work the moves and as the first was the toughest, i’d get that nailed. A tactical shoe change and a subtly different left foot hold and suddenly i was latching the first move.

Then, wanting to get it dialled in, i gave it another blast and suddenly found myself hanging the finger jug rail. Now i was no longer over the pad and pondered very quickly what to do. At one point i swung a foot out to try and drag the pad under me but thankfully missed as i’m sure that would’ve classified as a dab. It was decision time: step up or step off. I continued upwards.

Now anyone that knows this climb will be wondering what the hell i’m fussing about; it’s not high and not hard. But that landing had been (mistakenly playing on my mind. Plus, my confidence hasn’t been sky high lately. That and i’m a massive wuss.

I scrabbled over the horn feature like a first timer topping out. Seriously, even though no one else was there, it was embarrassing. Nevertheless, i didn’t touch the ground, didn’t go off route and had actually done it: V8 in a session!

In fact, i’d done more than that. I’d nailed a reasonably hard problem very quickly, true, but my mood had erupted after a somewhat sluggish start. I’d also found some much needed confidence and as daft as it sounds, just walking down to the car i felt so much more comfortable on my feet on rock. On the way up, i skirted carefully round the little rocky section of path. Now i danced my way purposefully through it. All of a sudden, i felt on top of the world. The only thing that could bring me down now was some sort of abominable and debilitating headache or something…

Sorry for the lack of pictures: my phone broke at the back end of last week so Instagram posts were out. I’ve also lost some of the old pictures from the scouting mission and being as i was expecting to be alone, hadn’t bothered with a camera proper. Fixed now, should have some snaps to brighten the next post. 

Several Sessions To Send

In hard bouldering, you don’t measure success by ascents. Well, you do and you don’t. Obviously you’re never gonna think someone is a really good climber because they’ve done a load of individual moves in the middle of various climbs. Nevertheless, when you look a little closer at individual sessions, if you measured a their success by whether you climbed something or not, you’d rarely be happy!

Get in deep enough and a good session can even be managing to hold the holds or to almost do one of the hard moves. That’s exactly how it went for me on Monday in Maes Newyddion. The plan was to head over with the family and have a play on Roof of a Baby Buddha 7c+ to see how poorly i would do. Meanwhile, before we left i’d been scrolling through instagram and found a video of the line to the left, Grey House 8a that looked interesting so i thought i’d check that out too.

Grey House. Borderline but most beasties seem to give it 8a. Pocket drag is 👌

A post shared by Chris Doyle (@doylo99) on

Success on this was set on being able to simply do all the individual moves on Buddha Roof, but if i were only able to hang each position, that would suffice as average. Any less than that and i’d be heading home with my head held low.

As we arrived, it turned out we weren’t alone and that old friends Tim Peck and Will Oates were already there, playing on not only Buddha Roof but also Grey House while their companion, who i had not met before named Tom, was in the middle of working on a line i didn’t know about, Teenage Buddha 7a+.

The stand start almost fell on the first effort, as a bit of a warm up around the 6c mark before taking a further three attempts to finish off. It was repeated a few times before i joined Tom on Teenage Buddha. It relinquished quite quickly, if i’m honest, and in much the same as my recent Parisella’s Cave session, i was astounded to be leaving with a new tick!

With the exit moves of Buddha Roof now completed, i tried the starting moves and found that they were equally straightforward, with only the crux moves in the middle left to finish off. Plus the link up, of course.

But i moved left to join Tim on Grey House instead. He was trying the tricksome second move – a dyno from a mediocre left drag crimp and a right pocket to the slopey top – and couldn’t quite get it dialled in every time, for reasons even he didn’t really comprehend. Intrigued, i joined him and to my astonishment, found it going pretty well! After a couple of tries, i was moving in the right direction and after watching the aforementioned video and getting extra beta, i was slapping the top hold!

Eventually, everyone departed the crag and left me alone with Tess to continue jumping into the air. Periodically, i’d jump off the floor to find the right position but of course, this didn’t simulate the swing i would experience. Nevertheless, once i’d ripped my finger open and decided to call it a day, i was pretty happy with my efforts: session success indeed.

The following day was less climbing orientated and by the time i finally headed out of the door with Tess in tow, the ground was wet and the sun shortly to set. So instead of taking pads, i just took a guidebook and went exploring a project in the back of my mind for a while: Lizard King in the pass.

There are two versions listed in the old guide: a V10 straight up through some slanting shelves and small crimps up to a letterbox hold and a lower V8 version from the crimps onto a finger-jug rail to finish in the same place.

I haven’t been sure whether to add these to The List so went on a scouting mission. Lizard King High as i’ve heard it known does seem the better line but with a wild swing at the top and while falling straight down would be without serious consequence, to come off during the swing would invite a long tumble down the hill. So for now, i’ll just try the low version. That, for me, would certainly constitute a good session.

Solstice: Goal Setting Time Again

A whole month since my last post just goes to highlight quite how little has been going on for me lately, although there have been a few notable climbing-related activities – most notably on the coaching front.

After a break from coaching over the summer (due to distractions like baby-related fussing and DIY) i’ve got back into it recently, slowly remembering what to do and culminating last weekend on attending the BMC Coaching Symposium in Manchester. It was a fantastic experience, from Kris Peters talking about strength and conditioning training to Udo Neumann and his movement workshops, with plenty more as well. It has relit the fire that had burned very brightly to begin with to progress as a coach rather than a climber and has led to some deeper thinking and understanding of climbing since then. I will look to write up some of these ideas and publish them soon.

Other than that, my focus has been on getting back to vaguely the levels of strength i held back in March on that cold day at Sheep Pen and my career-high tick of 7c+. As such, any advances on outside climbing (despite the potentially dry conditions) have been ignored in favour of indoor cranking and a focus on training. A six-month pass at the Indy has helped drag me down more often and the advent of the aggregate has given me some much needed structure.

Where the List had acted as an inspiration, once my strength had dropped a little, i found that even the easiest lines on there had become too dificult and actually, it was becoming more detrimental than helpful. The best way to get back on track: get strong again.

The main issue, that i am sure most climbers can empathise with, is a niggling feeling in my right arm, from my elbow to to midriff. At the moment, i’m persevering carefully and praying it isn’t anything too serious.

Of course, this all leads nicely to today’s significant date: it’s the mid-season solstice!

Some Highlights

First though, it would be unfair to mention some of the highlights from the last six months. After all, there have been some huge ones!

On the climbing front, the Great Swedish Bouldering Tour will certainly sit as one of the greatest trips of all time. While there wasn’t too much in the way of actual climbing, the number of crags and variety of climbing was unprecedented and will live long in the memory  – there is too much to think of quickly here.

Meanwhile, while the week in Scotland again yielded a meagre amount of time on rock proper, a taste of Torridon was enough to remind me that while you don’t have to get on a boat or a plane to get to Scotland, it does not reduce it’s appeal at all – we need to go back. Emily will not complain.

And of course, the biggest news of all: the onset of fatherhood come late February. I’m not sure what to say about it, other than i cannot wait. This is something i’ve wanted for many years and i’m thrilled that not only is it now actually going to happen, i’ve found the perfect person for it to happen with. Even if becoming a father meant an end to my climbing career, it would be worth it but i don’t think anyone would put money on that outcome happening. Far more likely is for me to have a willing and budding apprentice… Only time will tell what will happen but whatever that is, it’s going to be amazing.

Clocks Fall Back

This weekend, the clocks have gone back an hour, meaning several things: firstly, any ideas of daylight after-work sessions are now firmly out for the next few months and of course meaning we are now exactly half-way through the yearly cycle.

That means it’s time to review the last goals, find out how well (or poorly) i’ve done and set some more for the next season. Of course, with this being only the solstice and not the New Year, there are still some outstanding, which is ideal, giving me some continuity. So let’s start by looking at the goals set for Summer 2016

Last Season’s Goals:
  • Three 8a climbs
  • At least 7c abroad
  • More first ascents and a comprehensive topo
  • SPA Assessment
And how did it go?

Erm, yeah, not great, reading that little list! but not that bad either.

Three problems at 8a was always going to be an impossible ask but i knew that when i wrote it; it was more a case of trying to spur myself on. To be honest though, psyche levels fell dramatically mid-season and unless i’d maintained the improvment i’d seen over the previous 18 months, it was never going to happen.

Psyche levels wax and wane regularly with climbing and continually being completely keen to get out all the time is not sustainable. The trick with these things is to accept that sometimes, you just need a break from it all and running with that. Getting the news that i’m having a baby probably affected me too (not that i’d change that for the world but you know what i mean).

Likewise, even booking onto an SPA Assessment proved a step too far, although i think i underestimated quite how difficult a step this would be for me. The true fact is that once i’ve ticked that box, my rack and my ropes will doubtless be going deep into the back of the loft – such is my dislike of trad climbing. Don’t get me wrong, i see the appeal but for me, it is something i no longer wish to pursue and thankfully, these days i don’t have to. This one is going to be a much tougher task that i’d thought.

But it’s not all doom and gloom. 7c abroad did indeed go this season, with success on Carnage assis 7c of all things. It was slightly tactical but almost didn’t pay off and did cost me far more of my week than i had intended. Nevetheless, by picking the extended version of a line i know so intimately, i gave myself a real fighting chance and did indeed manage to tick off this particular milestone.

Meanwhile, a late-season surge on the boulders in Bryn Engan meant that more first ascents did arrive… sort of. To be honest, the problems on the Bryn Engan boulder were all probably climbed many moons ago but not recorded, meaning i’m not actually thinking they’re first ascents proper. Instead, i’m claiming first recorded ascent of five lines; the pick of the bunch being Awaiting Arthur’s Arrival 7a+ – a sligtly convoluted link up line but a good one nonetheless.

The comprehensive topo hasn’t happened though. Decent photographs are certainly needed, with time to actually create and edit something that will stand up to the rigours of the navigation of boulderers. Still, i’ve seen and heard of Prowess and the lines of the Mymbyr Boulder going in the new guide. To be honest, that’s far more of a coup than my own little scribblings!

So, about fifty per cent of the objectives done probably gives a fair assessment of my levels of success. Given the dip in psyche and ability during the latter half of the season, i’m not going to complain!

2016 Winter Goals

At the “turn of the year” i’d even set some Winter goals: train weaknesses, harness strengths and create a training plan. Hmm.

These are all worthy goals but i suspect possibly don’t quite go far enough. True they are excellent focal points but more is needed if i’m to get back to ticking the goals i’ve missed to date.

8a is still atainable, if i can find the right one. An SPA is again achieveable, despite it being winter. A topo will take a few days at a computer. Still, more things are needed and life has certainly changed substantially since that post in the latter days of March.

2016 Autumn/Winter Goals – short term

Get strong. Get back in training. Get the psyche back! That has to be the key and is already on the cards as i continue to tick off the problems at the Indy on my little sheet. My focus at the moment has to get to a point where the List is inspirational and not demoralising and if i can’t do that, it needs redrawing – it is currently detrimental.

Getting back into coaching is a must too. Granted, three sessions a week may have represented an incessent and unsustainable surge of enthusiasm – and possibly a hint that i was more single than i’d realised – but getting back in the wall with that different head on is now just as important to me as a climber.

  • Get strong and create that training plan.
  • Coach regularly
  • Keep on top of the aggregate
  • 7c outside – most likely Nazgul’s Traverse

2016 Autumn/Winter goals – season long

That SPA Assessment needs to happen; i’m gonna have to suck it up at some point, although don’t be surprised to see this one on my to-do list at the end of next March too.

Meanwhile, the aggregate remains a strong priority for me. I have mentioned in a previous post that my final standing of fourth last year may have been akin to Leicester winning the Premier league so a reasonable aim may be to finish top-5 this time around. This should do it, as long as i’m not too upset if it doesn’t happen.

As mentioned above, leaving 8a on there isn’t beyond the realms of possibility but reigning it in from three to one is probably wise given the dip i’ve had. I’ll come back just as strong, if i truly want to, but there’s no point getting carried away and if i do tick off one, i’m not going to suddenly stop because i’ve achieved that goal.

Finally, my coaching needs to develop a little more into a structured activity if i’m to continue heading in the direction i want it to. I’ve been reading lots about coaching in other sports and this is not bad thing. Next is to consolidate my thinking, come up with some tangible points and create a coaching philosophy. Do this, and i’ll be setting myself up nicely for the future.

  • SPA Assessment
  • Top Five in the Indy Aggregate
  • At least one 8a climb
  • Create a coaching philosophy

Awaiting Athur’s Arrival wasn’t just a route name plucked out of the back of my mind because it sounds good. At the back end of the coming season, my first offspring will be here and everything WILL change. While this isn’t necessarily the end, or indeed a bad thing at all, it does mean this is possibly my last chance to climb and train as i’ve known it in the past. It’s important to make the most of it – and enjoy it too!

Perhaps there’s a lesson in there for all of us? Whatever you’re up to this Winter, have a great time and the Very Best of Psyche To You!

Merry Solstice!

Lulls and The Battle Against Sweat

I’d been meaning on writing a moaning piece; a wingeing, complaining feel-sorry-for-me diatribe on roasting heat, failing standards and an inability to do what i wanted.

Then i finished work on Tuesday night and left for home. Not thirty seconds out of the drive, i took in the view – one i see daily but rarely stop to appreciate. I saw the green of the grass, the still water of the lake, the crags on the hill above me, even the rust on the barbed wire of the fence that often fails to pen the sheep successfully and thought next week, this will be Sweden. Then just as suddenly, and? What’s wrong with this?

Now Thursday, and i’m a bit lost as to what to write about!

The Negative

I can’t deny that my standards have dropped significantly recently – not three months ago, i ticked my first V10 and now struggle on 7b+ – and, with climbing being my underlying reason for being, have been a little down of late. The problem with all your eggs in one basket is when that basket gets a whole, you’ve lost all your eggs.

Part of the issue is evidently in my head. I’m lacking psyche and commitment; something i alluded to in my last post. This hasn’t changed since then, although i am now a lot more aware of it.

And while i’m not normally one for blaming conditions for poor performance, it has been so ludicrously hot lately that even sitting around at work means bathing in clothes soaked with your own sweat! When even walking in to the crag is a feat of human endeavour, it’s not really a surprise i’m not climbing at my peak lately!

This has also led to a drop in strength and if i’m honest, the idea of mid-summer training in the wall is almost soul destroying. I don’t remember the last time it rained, i should be outside! Making the most of it! Which then leads to feelings of guilt. And this has led me on to a mild epiphany.

The Positive

Truth be told, i took a few weeks off climbing. At first, this was due to a weird niggle in my right arm but then developed into not particularly wanting to go out! And do you know what? The world didn’t end, i didn’t spontaneously combust, nothing happened! In fact, i just found myself enjoying being alive in weather that wasn’t soaking me from above on a daily basis.

I spent more time with Emily, just living (and moving her into the house, progressively) and walking the dog, teaching her to swim. I’ve detached myself so much from climbing these past few weeks, i voluntarily gave up a spare evening alone to faff around the house and take Tess down to the lagoons for some swimming. And it felt great!

Not that i’ve stopped entirely, with two notable sessions. An old friend, Glyn, got in touch to see if i was keen for a blast on Corridors of Power 7c+/8a. With it now being on the list, i thought i’d give it a blast, scout it out, see what it’s like. It was also nice to support a friend on a project.

It went well, although i’m still not strong or confident. Maybe that’s the key for now – find out the beta on climbs while i’m struggling? Or perhaps sticking to focusing on a few is a better idea? Not sure. I do know we had a great evening before being chased away by midge – another issue with summer bouldering in North Wales.

The other excellent session was with Emily. We’d talked about doing more with ourselves and it occurred that a prolonged dry spell like this opens up the mountain crag, Cwm Dyli. It’s not so much the rock that needs to dry out, it’s the approach and as we romped across the hillside, I reveled in the fact the ground was bone dry.

I didn’t actually get much done, and nothing new – the intended V8 being a lot harder to fathom than i’d expected. Far more importantly though was the success Em enjoyed! She flashed her first V1 with relative ease, after some demo and beta from me and then, just as importantly, tried something harder and experimented with different positions and grips. What’s crucial is after failing, she got back up and tried it again.

If you asked her, Emily would say she’s not much of a climber but she does get out there and try things, and is willing to give it a blast every now and again. We’ve only climbed a couple of times together a couple of times but i have been taken by how technically good she is – honestly. I’ve seen much more dedicated climbers struggle to grasp concepts she just does naturally. On our little session, I was very impressed and proud of her and thrilled she’s coming out and joining me at the crag. Even more importantly, she wants to join in and that makes all the difference.

Most importantly of all, i’ve learned over the last few weeks that when the weather is nice, it’s good to be alive. It doesn’t matter that i’m not climbing hard things, it’s just pleasant being here. This is why we live here after all! So that when the weather is nice like this, we’re already here. Going back to our opening sentence, why would you want to be anywhere else?

Upcoming

Not that any of this recent zest for life in North Wales has quelled any of my longstanding wanderlust. My ferry is now booked for Monday morning, 00:50 and from there the adventure begins. It’s a tale of foreign friends and familiar faces, of miles of driving and bouldering all over Southern Sweden.

I’m past the point of nervousness now and am itching to get going. Granted, i have a long and lonesome first stage – driving to Kobnhavn alone to meet Simon – but from there, i shouldn’t be alone much.

There’s a host of venues i’m hoping to hit, for at least a day or two: Kjugekull, Vastervik, Gavle, Stockholm, Hono, it’s gonna be a proper little road trip! But with standards being what they are, and my annual goal of a foreign 7c being done and dusted, i’m going to put a cap on projects for this one at 7b+ to try and stop me wasting time on things i’m unlikely to succeed on. If i can get a brace of 7b, it’ll push my annual average up as it is, and a few 7b+ will push that still further.

But that isn’t the goal for this one. It’s a fact finding tour, a chance to experience some new and cool places, to see some old friends and to generally chill out, recover a bit and have a good time. That starts Sunday night. In the meantime, just rest it out i guess. Oh and pack at some point…

Pre Tournament Friendly

Well that was unexpected! I spent most of yesterday pondering what to do with myself; play football, go climbing, or bum around and wait for a barbeque on behalf of the Fast Trackers at work, i couldn’t make up my mind. My mind flitted back and forth for hours, much to Em’s dismay as i refused to commit to a decision.

At about five o’clock, i bumped into Alex Cutbush from work and immediately asked what he was doing this evening. When i said to come for a climb, he was keen and my mind was finally made up. Soon after, we were in the Landy heading to Rhiw Goch.

There will undoubtedly always be things to get done at Rhiw Goch – the grades range from Gap of Rohan 6c right up to Poppy’s Move 8a+ with a good spread in between. There’s then plenty of scope nearby for other new lines on nearby blocks. It’s also conveniently close to work and a great option for an after work blast.

So it was a good option, with two good problems from The List: Nazgul’s Traverse and Badgers In The Mist both 7c. I’ve spoken a lot recently about Badgers so i won’t go into it any more than to say it was there waiting for me to go back. So, after a repeat of Gap… and Ride the Wild Smurf stand at 7a from a fractionally lower start than normal, we got on to the projects. For Alex, this was Moria 7b which would’ve been his first.

And he was close too. I had a few efforts in the interests or warming up and actually found myself cruising up with relative ease – yet another thing to raise the optimism levels for next week! Most importantly the style was really good; smooth, careful, no cutting loose, it went really well. But of course, this was Alex’s project and on something like his second go, he almost nailed it.

Another one for last night and almost more impressive than my own tick at #rhiwgoch – this is @alexcutbush working #moria 7b. He was really close on the one attempt, and a sterling #effort it was too, considering his top grade so far is 7a+ And that's the thing with #climbing: it's entirely personal. Me getting a fifth 7c wouldn't be anywhere near as impressive in my eyes as Alex breaking a new grade, and that would be the same at any level. It's all relative, something I hammer home when coaching and something every climber, no matter what grade they #climb should always remember. #inspiration #worldclasswales #snowdonia #northwales #northwalesbouldering #bouldering #rockclimbing #climbing_photos_of_instagram #climbing_pictures_of_instagram #climbing_is_my_passion #meclimbing @plasybreninstaff

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It’s a weird problem, Moria, in that it’s definitely flashable but at the same time, very easily dropped. It really was a great effort by Alex and he was so close, i felt sure, if he could nail that first move again, he’d have gone and ticked off a new grade – always something that requires respect.

Sadly, it didn’t go for him and we quickly thrust the pads under Badgers… for my first effort at the sit start proper. I’ve half-tried it before and found it utterly desperate and this time was no different – i couldn’t get off the floor! After getting frustrated and pissed off, i sulked slightly and shuffled the pads under Nazgul’s…

This one is even worse and i couldn’t figure out a sequence at all. I got completely shut down and didn’t stay on it long. After offering to move the pads back for Alex (to which he politely declined) i figured i’d have another blast on the other 7c.

I had a quick look at some video beta from the first ascent and found the foot sequence was slightly different to what i’d been doing and there was a mild twist of the hips. It was only the first two moves that were blocking me so i figured i’d try this new beta. First effort, i nailed the first move.

All of a sudden, a problem that looked like it would take me months suddenly opened up and looked like it might go. A quick shuffle of the pads, some tactical positioning of my spotter and soon the second move fell too, although my feet slipped off. So close, i was shocked.

I opted for a quick fag-break rest but when it went out, i took that as a sign and got on it again. Slap, boom, first move stuck and then a throw out left and i was still on. Alex directed (verbally) my heel onto the good hold and i slowly reached through to the lip-jug, matched and was on the exit jugs, my heel above my head to the right, my head leaning backwards to see the trees and the sky inverted in the distance. I topped it out and looked down, utterly shocked. Here was a problem that looked well out of my short term ability and one that had caused me so much consternation recently that had suddenly yielded.

So good prep indeed! A bit achy but still in one piece, i was thrilled at my choice, and equally thrilled for my friend that new ground for him may soon be broken – more so than i’d realised! for this evening, while i was in the middle of the opening paragraphs of this very post, i discovered he’d gone and done his first V8: Ultimate Retro Party at the Cromlech Boulders.

I am genuinely super chuffed for him – he’s a great guy and deserves the plaudits. I’m sure this won’t be the first and that Moria will fall for him very soon as well. Hopefully we’ll get out and get more done over the summer!

Distractions

Well that was a quiet start to the New Year! And an unexpected one if i’m honest! Writing that last post, and with various trips penned and in the pipeline for year ahead, i thought i’d be chomping at the bit to get out and get climbing but, what with injuries and other distractions, i seemed to lose psyche for a week or two there.

Sometimes psyche and enthusiasm do take a bit of a hit – you simply can’t maintain a constant level of desperation to get out forever (or i can’t anyway). So i’ve not really done much in the last few weeks, as shown on my instagram feed and a series of old photos replacing anything new and exciting.

There are a couple of exceptional sessions though; mainly on Diesel Power 8a at the Cromlech Boulders, once in daylight on the way home and the other Tuesday gone. Neither were particularly anything to write home about – hence the lack of writing – merely to point out how hard this project is going to be.

It’s a unique problem really: the crimp handholds being reasonable, especially for the grade of climb! The crux seems to be entirely in the feet and keeping them on the smoothly polished holds using intense body tension that i seem to be lacking. Far too often, when trying to move anything at all, or even sometimes when simply trying to hold the position i find myself in, my feet will inexplicably part company with the rock, bringing me down to the pad with a thud.

Meanwhile, under the near-horizontal roof sits another bloc – one trodden by many thousands of feet to walk around and stand atop this roadside boulder; tourists wanting to summit something and get a feeling for the outdoors. The problem is that this rock underneath you is quite close behind and until you are reaching the exit moves, there is zero chance of cutting loose. It crossed my mind that if that boulder didn’t lie so close beneath you, this classic would probably be a full grade easier.

So you set up on any of the hard moves and pull on only to find your feet sliding off and you returning back to sit on the pad (assuming your pad hasn’t moved down the slope but thankfully, this seems fairly rare). It is undoubtedly one of the most frustrating and annoying problems i’ve ever encountered and one that will take some intense training, i fear.

Not to mention multiple sessions but the important bit of that is they need to be productive sessions and these last two really didn’t fit into that category. The daytime session taught me nothing i didn’t already know other than i’m still quite a way off from this project and that i was not in condition to be getting on something at the limit of my abilities. Such is the nature of roadside boulders though – they’re very tempting when you’ve not got much time… or inclination for that matter.

Such was the situation Pablo found himself in this week when he finished work late and headed into the Pass for a quick blast. Completely dark with cloud cover clouding any moon or star light, i noticed his lamp under Jerry’s Roof from quite a way away, slowing to see who was keen on my way past. When i noticed my good friend, i had to stop.

I watched as he tried Bus Stop 7b+ several times, this time making the first moves with relative ease before struggling after the crux, he moved onto Bus Stop RH 7c and i joined him before we both headed up to Diesel Power. To be fair though, while i struggled to make any gains, seeing how much Pablo struggled with any move at all did make me realise i’m a lot closer than recent sessions had led me to believe.

Considering my recent unintentional abstinence from climbing, partially to rest the two hip injuries i’d sustained in recent weeks, perhaps i’m being a bit hard on myself. With a Font trip looming, it had occurred that i might be out of shape when i get to the forest too and so, the smallest amount of rain convincing me that i was justified not going outside, i took a trip to the Indy on Sunday gone, with the express intention of seeing how well i’d do in a session.

Turns out it was quite well, and better than i was expecting! A flash on a 7b (albeit one that suited but it certainly didn’t feel hard!) and very close on a 7c filled me with enthusiasm. I had another session the following evening when i found myself there for some coaching that felt like i had no energy at all, granted but even then, said 7c still fell. Perhaps my hard ticklist for the forest may not be that ambitious after all?

So now, local projects have taken a back seat. A major back seat – imagine sticking them upstairs at the back of a double decker bus. Focus is now entirely making sure i’m in the best possible shape for the end of next week when i make the familiar drive through two of Europe’s busiest cities overnight. I’m so excited, especially to be climbing there with one of the few friends who would make the invite-to-my-wedding list [an imaginary list to distinguish my closest friends] who is also ticking around the same grade as myself.

It’s impossible to know how a trip is going to turn out but you always get a bit of an inkling and this one feels pretty good. The politics and troubles setting up have been and gone and now the path looks clear and my mind is just waiting to be there now. This, along with the other trips of the year, seem to have encompassed every ounce of thought in my head lately – to the extent that, to my eternal shame, i forgot my parent’s wedding anniversary this week. I feel terrible about it and hope that they can forgive me, being the ones that instilled the wanderlust that drives me so much of the year. Maybe one year, i’ll get to take them too; not so much for climbing but just to experience an area of the world so beautiful and magical. I hope so, as they took me to experience so many places in my life, it would be an honour to repay such kindness one day.

They have a lot to answer for in this aspect of my life, my parents. And i will forever be grateful for that.

Happy New Year!

I cannot find exactly where i first said about it but somewhere on here, i mentioned about the 1st January being poor as a climbers New Year. It’s right in the middle of the mid-winter season and your goals and objectives should be squarely in place and on the go by then. Maybe a quick review but resolutions for the year ahead? No, not now, just keep training.

The time to set your next goals and objectives is now: the weekend the clocks change. Twice annually, it’s the right time to assess where you’re at and plan for what’s coming. So in that spirit, here goes:

2015 Assessment

@fredrikfa88 on a climb that turned out not to be the one we thought it was… #font #bouldering #climbing

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Since this time last year, so much has changed it’s hard to imagine! Having just returned from a frankly poor trip to Font, the first ascents continued to come with Fluffion 6a+, OGYDd 6c+ and culminating in my crowning achievement: Prowess 7b. Around that time i’d also managed to step my game up a bit with an ascent of Bus Stop 7b+ in the Llanberis Pass. This was also quickly followed by Ultimate Retro Party 7b to keep the trend coming.

Then followed the best trip to date: Magic Wood 2015. Perfect conditions, vibrant scene and some hard ticks! Intermezzo 7c, Dinos Don’t Dyno 7b and Bosna Genial 7a flash to name a couple of highlights marked my most successful trip since Font 2014 and my Carnage tick. I came back buoyed and psyched.

And that kicked off a summer of relentless success: Fish Skin Wall 7a+, The Pinch 7a+, Original Traverse 7b on the Brenin Boulder, The Gimp 7b even a flash of Wavelength (stand start) 7b+ as now graded in the new guide. The introduction of The List this time last year inspired me to get out at every opportunity and gave me the focus and autonomy to be able to narrow it down to the best possible option, with the last hard tick of the year being Love Pie 7c.

A dry spell followed Fredrik’s visit at the end of October (while it rained relentlessly) and so i got training in the wall, competing in the Indy Aggregate once again but not wholeheartedly as i was also training in the Mill and at Work. Oddly, the host of potential venues meant i actually did a lot less than i otherwise would but that didn’t seem to matter once i finally got out again.

February came and with it dry rock and fresh enthusiasm. Save for the occasional day (to tick Popcorn Party 7a mainly after many years) i hadn’t really been out since October so when i finally could, the List took a big hit. Johnny’s Problem 7b in the Pass, the Witches Knickers 7b and Toe Dragon into Kingdom of Rain 7b all fell within the month but the best was yet to come. Nearly two years after my first 7c, and five mixed sessions, i cracked the next grade: Jerry’s Problem V10 at Sheep Pen.

Giving it beans yesterday on #jerrysproblem at #sheeppen. Session 3 on this one and I stuck the first two hard moves fairly quickly, much to the surprise of the excellent crew surrounding me. Sadly it didn't go and despite dry #rock this morning, and a repeat to try and keep the momentum going, it again eluded me. With rain falling this afternoon and another day off not until a week Thursday, it's not looking likely to be going any time soon. Still, it's not going anywhere and the weather is starting to turn… Photo credit to @michelle.l.wardle and top marks for capturing a great move with a great shot #northwales #northwalesbouldering #bouldering #rockclimbing #climbing #climbing_is_my_passion #climbing_pictures_of_instagram #climbing_photos_of_instagram

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Until i just wrote that, i didn’t realise how long i’d been on 7c as a top achievement and now, it seems silly as i’ve already been working on my first 8a! Which brings us to the next section.

2016 Spring/Summer Goals – short term

Put simply, it’s carry on as before and try to keep ticking them off The List… although thinking about it, adding the goal of “try and stop going on about the List” may not be a bad one too!

I’d quite like to concentrate on the four that remain from the inaugural version: Shocker 7b in Beddgelert Forest, Going Down On An Elephant 7b at Elephantitus Cave, Animal Magnetism V8 high above Caseg Fraith and Roof of a Baby Buddha 7c+. The latter has been the last to receive some serious attention and it’s gone well! Just need to bear them in mind during a dry spell.

In summary:

  • Keep ticking off the List
  • …but stop talking about the List as much
  • concentrate on the oldest four.

2016 Spring/Summer Goals – season long

Obviously knowing this was coming, i’ve been pondering this and a few weeks ago, i was hoping for my first 7c+ and maybe 8a. With recent developments, this has now changed and now sits at three 8a climbs this season/year.

I’d also quite like to get a 7c abroad. With plenty of opportunities to do this lined up for this year, it should be a distinct possibility, even though it can often take multiple sessions. It’ll take some attention to pick the right one(s) but it’s certainly attainable. If it goes quick enough, maybe 7c+ is also achievable but only time will tell on this.

Finally, i’d like to keep going on the first ascents in Bryn Engan and create a proper topo for everything in the forest. The new guide is looking closer all the time and i’m really hoping that my lines will make the cut. Getting a sufficient circuit may be the key and there’s plenty of projects currently waiting to be cleaned and climbed.

Oh, one more thing. As my coaching develops, i’d like to take this to the next level and the next hurdle will be to obtain my SPA proper. Assessments for the Foundation and Development coach can’t happen until i have a “group management” style award and that’s the most sensible and obvious one to do.

  • Three 8a climbs
  • At least 7c abroad
  • More first ascents and a comprehensive topo
  • SPA assessment

2016 Autumn/Winter Goals

Now that i’ve got into training a bit more and have some substantial facilities, it’s time i actually made proper use of them. Following an end-of-season review of course, the goal would be to train my weaknesses properly, develop my strengths a bit more (something i feel people should probably do a bit more – they’re the bits you’re good at, harness that!) and put some structure in place to be able to do this. It’s something i’ve never done and something that would benefit not only me personally but would be crucial to my development as a coach.

  • Train weaknesses
  • Develop strengths
  • Create a proper training plan and stick to it!

All of these should be perfectly sensible objectives and will push me on the way to being actually quite good. I have ideas in mind for longer term but to put them in place now would be folly – this is enough to be going at for now and thinking too far into the future risks losing sight of the short term goals.

So i’ll leave you with a Best of Psyche! greeting and wishing you all…

Happy New Year!!!

Admitted

Sometimes, the hardest part about injuries is admitting you’re injured. I mean, most of the time it’s not – you’re in pain and you can feel it but every now and again, it’s subtle enough that denial can overwhelm the issue and you carry on regardless.

After last week’s nasty fall, i ended up having a few days off (thanks to working, to be fair) before heading out again on Friday night. To be true, it felt fine, almost entirely healed and i was scratching at the door to get out of work and climb something. Diesel Power was the obvious aim but when i found out Em was heading in the opposite direction to help out a friend, i opted to follow and stop off to try the modern classic Roof of a Baby Buddha 7c+ instead.

In the woods near #betwsycoed is a lone #boulder with a problem of such majesty, it cannot be ignored. #roofofababybuddha is it's name, 7c+ it's grade, around ten moves that are simply stunning. What's odd is that only today I was looking at @shaunacoxsey on instagram and thinking I'd like to see more outdoor pics (then I realised it's comp season and I was being stupid). Then, when searching online for video beta, I found a vid of her on this very same #climb. Strangely, sat here while it gets slowly darker, feel a bit honoured to be getting on the same problems as one of Britain's best. Might have to watch it again to try and nail the sequence… #worldclasswales #northwales #northwalesbouldering #bouldering #rockclimbing #climbing #climbing_photos_of_instagram #climbing_pictures_of_instagram #climbing_is_my_passion #meclimbing

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It’s one of the few remaining from the original list (one of four in fact) but a touch more conditions dependent, being hidden away in the forest and being quite porous rock. Found by local beast and super nice guy Dave Noden while out for a walk with his son and subsequently one of North Wales best grade 7 lines. It’s been on my radar since i first saw it a couple of years ago.

So, with everything falling into place, i sprinted from work, drove up the forest track to drop off the large pile of stuff, then back down to leave the car at the bottom of the hill. There was a touch of a contentious issue about parking here for a little while so i would strongly emplore people to park at the bottom of the hill and walk up. It might seem odd, with plenty of suitable parking spots along that track but this is what has been requested by the locals so please abide the requests and don’t jeopardise access for this stunning boulder. Besides, you’d be surprised how much traffic i saw drive past while i was there.

So, warmed up by running back up the hill, i quickly blasted through the “standing start” (there isn’t a separate climb as a standing start, just so you know) following lots of video beta. Then it was on to the business end of getting the tough moves through the roof wired.

The night’s are still creeping in too early at the moment so i armed myself with my new lantern right from the off, getting a bit more light in the shady roof straight away. It was a good session, getting most of the moves wired and feeling good with just the awkward foot swap to negotiate. And what’s more is that it didn’t hurt me at all.

But the next day was a different matter. All day, i felt stiff and achy and was torn with indecision whether to get out or not. Even as i began the descent down the road from Pen y Pass, i still couldn’t make up my mind so when i reached the Cromlech boulders and saw two lads finishing off the Edge Problem i opted to stop and have a chat.

It wasn’t long before i realised i wouldn’t make any progress on Diesel Power. While it might sound shallow, it kinda meant i didn’t want to bother climbing. I never like repeating climbs i’ve done before and at the Cromlech, there’s not much that’s easy and workable left. Still, the two lads i met were keen so i offered to show them the Cromlech Roof Crack V6/7 around the back, and maybe have a play on Sleep Deprivation V8.

I don’t regret the decision to try Buddha Roof on Friday but my choice to stop at the Cromlech was a poor one; driven by excessive keenness that clouded my judgement. It meant a regression in my recovery which was, in hindsight, idiotic – especially given i knew it was a bad idea at the time and did it anyway.

Sunday compounded the issue. I’ve spent the weekend not technically working but on a Development Coach Training course at work. While it was a good course, and much more relevant to the sessions i’m currently running than the Foundation Coach Training from last year, there was quite a lot of time in the climbing wall and at one point, i was asked to perform a drop knee as part of an exercise. As i did, my face screwed up in pain and i started making silly noises. It was so obvious that Dave Rudkin even came up to me afterwards and asked if i was okay, given i “looked in a lot of pain”.

That was the point i announced to myself that i am now injured; something that was far from easy to admit. I’ve always been pretty good at injuries, stopping as soon as i get any sort of tweak at all but this time, i feel i’ve pushed my luck a little. Even the belt of my trousers is making me feel sore. So, i’ve filled my evenings this week with other stuff, and am sacking off everything (even tonight’s coaching session) until Sunday. Even then, i’ll be playing it by ear and potentially just resorting to a beastmaker/campus session. In the mean time, i’ll be praying that’s enough.

Power Down

The bit now firmly between my teeth, and Emily busy for the evening, i stopped for an after-work session at the Cromlech boulders on the way home for an hour or so of torch-lit blasting up the next project: Diesel Power V11/8a. It might seem absurd and i’ve long since extolled the fact that it is one of the worst possible crags for me to gain a long term project (roadside is REALLY not dog-condusive) but if i’m honest, and probably a little bit arrogant to be fair, it doesn’t feel like it’s going to be that long a wait…

That might be me underestimating the climb slightly. I’ve lost count of the number of sessions on it to date – not because there have been that many, i’m just not good at keeping count – and have already done all the moves. It’s an iconic North Wales classic line; a must for anyone operating in that grade range and a good solid one for a first 8a that isn’t brutally hard for the grade. And it suits me very well indeed.

So with Jerry’s done, this is the next hard one on my radar. That’s not to say i’m only going to get on this for the next few months, but it is a priority, especially when i’ve only got a short while. Being roadside certainly does lend itself to torch-lit sessions on the way home so why not i guessed.

In the shadow of the great and imposing #dinascromlech tonight lay a torch lit #boulder and an 8a project: #dieselpower – the next big thing on my agenda. Layered up to the gills to try and ease the cold brought by the fierce wind, it turned out the temperature wasn't the way the wind had in mind to punish me. Bumping my hand on the third move, the pad, shuffled relentless by gusts, slid down from under me and a split second later, my left hand blew hard from the hold. With nothing now holding me up and momentum from that hand throwing me downwards rapidly, I hit bare rock. Hard. Hip first, then shoulders. I lay there for a second, wincing and gasping, checking how everything felt. A little over half an hour later, it's okay but REALLY hurts, right up into my lower back. I'll find out in the morning how bad it is. Shame really as I was linking the first four moves well with only one more really hard one to go! The lantern from #screwfix Was ace though, I'm sure you'll agree! #llanberispass #snowdonia #northwales #northwalesbouldering #bouldering #rockclimbing #climbing #climbing_photos_of_instagram #climbing_pictures_of_instagram #climbing_is_my_passion #headtorchsession #night #nightsession

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Anyway, after faffing far too much at work on the way out the door, eventually i rocked up at the layby next to the boulders keen as mustard and ready to give it a token gesture warm up before seeing if i had the Power. Turns out i wasn’t the only one from the Brenin with that idea; local all round beast Dave Evans was there also having a quick effort on the way home, and new Assistant Instructor Kris McCooey spotted us on the way to the Beacon and stopped off too.

It’s worth giving Kris a bit of a mention at this point. On the roadside face is a climb called The Edge Problem. Originally given V5 from the two horizontal slots, the ground has now eroded to the extent that even with stacked pads, this is out of reach for all but the unnaturally tall. These days, you’re far more likely to do the sit start – one where your backside simply cannot reach the floor.

Wherever you start, the problem is notorious. The slots for the stand start are fiercely small, as is the next hold for the left hand and many a strong climber has repeatedly been spat off this climb, often to the point of never going back. Two old friends who are both substantially stronger than myself have long since given up on it, finding their strong sausage fingers simply too big to get in the slots.

For those of us with small girly fingers, like me, he says smiling wryly to himself, the tiny slots soon become little finger jugs but nevertheless, The Edge Problem is still a fierce little boulder problem that bites back all those who don’t take the time to woo her correctly.

All except Kris, it seems. Kris arrived at the face, never having been and asked us what was there, starting with The Ramp V1 and then ticking off Pocket Wall V4, both slowly and carefully. By this point, i was getting impatient and had moved a pad under The Edge to warm up my fingers for my attempt on Diesel Power. Much to my surprise, he decided to join me and then did something i’m not sure i’ve ever seen before: he flashed it.

Not only did he flash it, he did it with such ease that as he rocked over the top, i was left feeling that he might pip me to Diesel Power, were he to stay and join me. While i continued to smoke as a post-warm up rest, he then got on the equally brutal Johnny’s Problem V7 next to it and dropped the last move. It was some of the most impressive climbing i have seen in a very long time.

Kris, Dave and Jack Rattenbury (another local who had rocked up for a quick session and headed to Jerry’s Roof with Dave) all departed and left me in the company of my lantern and self, underneath Diesel Power thinking “what if?”. Meanwhile, the wind continued to batter me and remind me that despite the nice weather, North Wales can often still have a bit of a kick to her sometimes; chilling my hands and blowing the pads out of position.

The problem is a fierce crimp fest that requires substantial body tension. Yet, the first move, for me at the moment, feels remarkably straightforward. The second follows suit and then i’m left with a choice: follow the normal beta and bump right hand up or go left hand onwards instead. Both moves feel equally fine and both will be followed by another brutal one so i’m trying to make my mind up. On my last effort, i opted to bump the right hand.

But as i did, possibly slightly distracted or maybe simply through too much sweat, my left hand exploded from the fine crimp. My right hand mid move, i was suddenly catapulted downwards with great force, unable to do anything about it. While this is not an uncommon occurence, on this occasion, it almost caused me substantial problems.

What had distracted me was my pad. The wind, as i’ve mentioned, had been lifting them and shuffling them around since i had placed them on the rock beneath the climb and while i was setting up to thrust upwards, i had heard it slide down the rock slightly.

Only it wasn’t a slight movement: it had completely moved from underneath me. So when i departed downwards with excessive force, there was nothing between by bony hip and the rock beneath.

I hit it with a thud, hard. The one consolation was that the force of my left hand had twisted me round in the air, meaning i didn’t fall straight back onto my back but instead landed entirely on my left hip, my shoulders falling back on the rock but the hip had taken the brunt of the force by this point. It was as bad as i’ve had for a long time.

I lay there trying to assess the damage. I often carry my phone on me while i climb, just in case and lying there, alone, in the dark, i wondered if this was one of those times i would be glad i had. This could be really bad, if i’ve broken something or cracked my pelvis but with no signs of nausea, i tentatively decided to try and get up.

Lots of groaning and moaning followed but thankfully, the pain wasn’t that bad and i seemed to be in tact. Such is the level of my enthusiasm at the moment, i considered trying again but being as i was struggling to walk, i opted to call it a night. Packing up was slow but eventually i got everything together, arrived home and proceeded to limp my way around and eventually have a rather uncomfortable nights sleep.

Today, i’ve been hobbling around Plas y Brenin, explaining with simply i “fell off” whenever quizzed. Nevertheless, given half a chance, i’d be there again tonight, after my shift finishes at 9pm and i’ve been home to collect stuff. Sometimes, the psyche is that high. It is purely from my better judgement that i’ve opted not to. Helps i’ve got an Em to keep me company.

Finding Shelter

I took no photos this week, despite dragging my camera with me everywhere i went, so in the interests of making this a little nicer on the reader, i’ve included some old ones that you may have seen and that are relevant. 

 

Okay so the last post ended with me sat contented under The Witch enjoying a smoke and a biscuit. So what happened next?

In my previous post, i’d been a little higher and found a small cluster of problems not previously explored, near Lotus. As it turns out, Lotus is an extension to another problem, Meadow Roof 6c+ and there are a few other excellent options there, so i trotted up the hill to see if i can get a few more ticks in my guidebook.

After deciphering the problems of Meadow Crack 6c and Killer Weed 6c+, they were quickly dispatched, sadly not as a flash but done nonetheless. Meadow Crack was actually one of the problems i’d completed last time, albeit adjusting the finish slightly to avoid foliage and dampness.

Then it was up to Meadow Roof and a bit of an ethical conundrum: i’d done the first move already while trying Lotus so was the flash still on? I reasoned that as it wasn’t hard, it probably was and i had flashed that move the previous time. The point became moot very quickly though when i bottled it, the pad being behind me, and fluffed said move on the first go… Second go and despite a mildly sketchy topout, the problem was done and i was back down on the pad, enjoying a drink and eating biscuits.

It did cross my mind to spend some time getting on something else but i felt done to be honest; a convenient time to call it a day as it were. While not as successful as i’d hoped after ticking off The Witches Knickers, it was a good session regardless and i walked down smiling at my own good fortune.

Once down in the valley floor, i quickly checked out two potential projects: Jerry’s Wall 7a (7b sit start) and Twilight of the Idols 7c+. The former required a spotter, the latter more pads so i quickly had a look at the holds and called it a day, heading back for a bit of a rest before that evenings coaching session at the Beacon.

I’ve suddenly been coaching quite a lot, after completing the Foundation Coach Training at the back end of last year. There was nothing for about two months and then i seem to be doing at least two sessions a week! This particular one was with a Rock Chicks group at the Beacon, helping out a friend of mine and was the second session with the same group. It did not go well…

I’m learning as i go along with coaching, refining my skills and learning the best teaching methods for each type of student. With this group, as i’d already met them, i wanted to try putting some structure in place. The problem was that i hadn’t met them before – only some of them – and the ability level ranged from someone with fantastic technique and great ability to some who were just learning to belay…

I won’t go into a big analysis here, i’ve done that elsewhere but leave it to say my mind was on something else, and it just didn’t work. And it was coming: a first bad session will always come eventually. The group didn’t seem phased and thanked me greatly for my help, Clare (who runs the group) was very pleased and i left to think through how to move forward from it. And you get your biggest lessons from the sessions that didn’t work!

It’s led to me coining the phrase Snippet Coaching – a type of coaching where you allow the group to climb as they normally would, maybe choosing the discipline, and dip in and out with tips, tricks and refinements to improve small aspects of technique. [There is probably already a term for this but i like my own one if i’m honest.] For a large or varied group, it seems to be the most effective way to coach, albeit with a large potential to lead people down the wrong path. i’ll sit down soon and write down some guiding principles to keep things on track.

It works as well, as Wednesday i did my first dedicated Snippet Coaching session with Gerwyn and his social group. It was spot on and i climbed with a youngster called Cian, tweaking and suggesting as we both went along. It allowed for a much more flowing session, allowing us to just take the path that seemed most natural at the time. It also means there’s much less prep involved…

So you throw all these things into the mix – a successful outdoor session, a great learning experience from a shit coaching session and a great coaching session to show me i’m on the right idea – and then include a fantastic indoor session at the climbing wall at Plas y Brenin, where i ticked two long standing projects, and a happy personal life as well, and right now, there’s not really much else you could add into the mix to make me much happier. I seem to be on a roll and long may it continue!